• Quick Summary: Whether you're a seasoned professional yoga instructor or you're just getting started with your yoga studio, it doesn't matter. Your passionate about yoga and you want to expand your existing clientele. You want to establish yourself as the go-to expert, having considered blogging about all the yoga topics your passionate about. So it's time to take that big step, create your own little place on the web and get your yoga website started. In this article you'll be given a comprehensive guide of steps involved in setting up your very own yoga website.

    Screenshots we're taken from the Yoga WordPress Theme

  • Choose your domain name

    The domain name is the name people type in the browser to get to your website. Or, alternatively, it's the name shown in the search results. If you're not new in the yoga scene and already have a brandname for your business, picking a domain name is easy.

    In terms of domain extensions it's best to stick with a .com domain. Or go for your country-specific extension. From an SEO (search engine optimization) perspective it's not a good idea to get really creative with extension.

    In the excellent article " How to Choose a Domain Name" the following guidelines are provided. Keep them in mind when you're thinking about the perfect name for your yoga studio website:

    - Make it brandable
    - Make it pronouncable
    - Make it as short as possible
    - Pick a .com domain or a country extension
    - Avoid infringing on existing trademarks
    - Make your domain name intuitive
    - Use broad keywords if possible ("yoga" is a keyword)
    - Get creative if your domain name isn't available

    Choose your hosting provider

    After people have thought of a domain, the next thing is hosting. You'll need a place to build your website online. And hosting providers offer such environments on their servers. To keep things simple, almost all starting offers are fine. Whether you decide to got for a giant like GoDaddy or Hostgator, a WordPress oriented hosting service like the one Siteground offers, or your local hosting provider, it doesn't really matter.

    There is no such thing as free hosting. It doesn't exist. So don't go searching for it. The only free options out there when it comes to hosting are varieties that include hosting on a sub-domain. That means the domain isn't actually yours but just an extension of the domain name of the provider. That means that you can indeed have a website but you don't build up any authority in the search engines, your hosting provider does on the back of your yoga site.

    Hosting had become a commodity with a near-zero financial margin. So hosting providers have become creative in how they crank up those margins. It usually involves getting you to commit to a very low price initially, which they heighten after the first year. Sometimes with a margin that's double or triple the initial price. Sind hosting usually accompanies registering the domain name, the increase in price can be for both.

    Page builder services like the ones from Wix, Weebly and Squarespace all include hosting with the initial theme or template you choose. They start of free and then charge for what they'll call "business" features. Having your own domain name is the most obvious one.

    Install WordPress

    You've probably heard about WordPress. WordPress is widely considered to be the easiest Content Management System on the planet. With the help of WordPress you create, maintain and publish a website or blog. WordPress powers 30.0% of all the websites on the internet. A number that’s still consistently growing. WordPress is trusted by big brand names, celebrities and Fortune 500 companies. So you’re going to be in good company if you’re going to use it.

    Best of all, WordPress itself is free. And almost all the big hosting providers offer specific WordPress hosting solutions. WordPress is very powerful and our tool of choice to power any site including the ones for yoga studios. If you choose for WordPress you will need a WordPress theme as well. WordPress itself is only used to configure general settings of the site and create the content. The theme actually displays that content in a way a browser can actually use.

    Even though WordPress is extremely powerful, it can also become very complex. And WordPress doesn't actually help you creating content, just as having a pen doesn't mean articles will suddenly write themselves. And WordPress might be free, a WordPress expert is not. WordPress is commonly seen as a great DIY product for building sites, but users may invariably stumble when confronted with inevitable problems and challenges. So be willing to at least invest some time learning the tool along the way.

    It is highly recommended you choose a hosting service that provides the WordPress installation with it. You have to ask yourself as a yoga expert if you really want to go of the deep end and trouble yourself with such a technical thing as installing WordPress.

    Choose a theme

    How to choose the right theme for your yoga studio? A quick search in Google with the phrase "yoga wordpress themes" provides you with a search results page filled with lists of yoga themes. However, if you dig a little deeper, you'll find that a lot of these overviews have themes in them that definitely have little if anything to do with yoga.

    For instance the following article " 24 Best Yoga WordPress Themes 2019", which is my first organic search result, supposedly has 24 yoga themes on display. Upon further inspection, only 10 of them at least resemble something a yoga teacher would use. And if you go really deep into the mechanics of the theme, only 2 themes ( Asana and Yogi) include yoga-specific functionality besides theme staples like a blog section and a contact page.

    The reason for this is that all of the websites with these types of articles make use of affiliate marketing. The core reason of the existence of these articles is not to provide the reader with the best yoga WordPress themes, but to rank as high in Google so they can make money with affiliate links. I don't blame them for making money this way. That's just the way it is. However it does mean the market get's flooded with the wrong type of information for people looking for the best theme to create a website for their yoga studio.

    Another difficulty with WordPress themes is that no two themes work the same. Each theme developer has their own way of doing things. And there's a big difference in quality between developers, let alone the quality in type of support they offer. So, if your that type of person, that likes to tinker around your best bet might be a page builder tool like Divi or Elementor. Where one is a theme, the other is a plugin (you'll need a separate theme for this one). Both include page builders that let's the user creates pages with drag-and-drop functionality. Both of these tools are for people with at least moderate web design skills.

    My recommendation is to always go for a supplier with a proven trackrecord. You and your yoga studio are probably in it for the long run. At least that should be your intention. And if that's the case you want a partner you can trust to be with you as the years stack up. Don't get seduced by the quick fix of a nice design. You're looking at a fully configured theme. Chances are, you have to start from scratch with a blank sheet.

    Create a compelling call-to-action for your yoga website

    You don't just want a website just so you can say you have a website. A website should support the goal you have in mind for your yoga studio. A high-quality yoga website is more than a fancy design and your yoga classes. The goal you set for yoga website is called your call-to-action. You want to create a compelling online environment where visitors are invited to take the action you want them to.

    The majority of yoga instructors will probably want enough clients to fill their yoga classes. That would mean the core goal of the website would be to entice visitors to either get into contact with you (pre-sale) or invite them to sign-up for one of your classes. The core focus of your entire site design and layout must resolve around this singular goal.

    People are so accustomed to websites being a certain way that it's a good thing to delve a bit deeper into creating a compelling call-to-action. Either read up on how to create a solid landing page by reading the article " The 5 Essential Elements of a Winning Landing Page". It's the best reference I know of that gives great pointers in what to include on your site in terms of compelling content that converts.

    Add your yoga classes

    No yoga website is complete within specific information about your yoga classes. There's a huge variety with respect to the types of yoga you can specialize in. Each geared towards a different audience. So it's a good idea to have a great mixture of different styles. Or maybe you and your colleagues are highly specialized in certain types of yoga. If that's the case, share it with your audience. You never know what will trigger someone to pick up the phone or signup for your class.

    Include a yoga schedule

    One of the most important aspects of your yoga website is your class schedule. Everyone is busy, so knowing what yoga class is when is a great way of knowing if they fit with your personal schedule. Make sure this important information is shown in an easily digestible format. Plain text is fine, but a table goes a long way in making your yoga class schedule information stand out.

    Add your yoga rates

    Even more important than the yoga class schedule is your current rates. Don't think that by keeping this information away from your site, it's a great incentive for people to call you to find out. No, it's seen as a nuisance when people have no idea what to expect in terms of payments for your yoga services. They'll rather refrain from asking you than to take the effort and pick up the phone. And what's so secret about what you ask for your specialized yoga skills anyway? So don't be shy and put them on your site.

    Think about possible yoga workshops

    Every now and then you might be thinking about spicing up your traditional yoga lineup with some extra workshops. Topics like doing yoga when pregnant, outside yoga classes, specific meditation classes, you name it. By thinking up front about them and setting certain event dates, it can really give a boost to how your clients perceive your yoga studio.

    Consider blogging about yoga topics

    You will probably have heard about the benefits of blogging for your yoga website. And there are a lot of resources online that talk about the do's-and-dont's when starting a blog. What they do not discuss is that blogging is not the same as running a yoga studio. It is true that when you have a yoga website, you're online one step removed from also having a blog (some themes even include a readymade blog section). But blogging can be a fulltime job in of itself.

    So if you decide to also start blogging besides running your yoga studio, you have to make sure if it's in line with your main goal. If your main goal / call-to-action is for people to sign up for your yoga classes, how is blogging about the latest fashion trends in yoga pants going to help? And getting loads of traffic doesn't mean it's relevant traffic, e.g. people interested in attending your class. A yoga studio is obviously very locally oriented. So unless you're letting people pay for onine courses, they physically have to be in the vicinity of your studio to be able to actually attend your yoga class.

    A good way to support the existing goal of your yoga website, is to write about topics your current clientele is interested in. Maybe after class you get a number of questions from your clients. Could be about certain ailments, food, supplements etc. It would be great if you could direct them to that article on your site, so they could read it at their own leisure. Or be inspired by it and write about it. Just realize that building up new followers and possible new clients based on blogging, is a very long term investment.

    Show your dedicated team of yoga teachers

    If you've been around long enough it might be that you aren't just a one-(wo)man yoga army. A staple for yoga studios consisting of more than just the founder is to include you and your yoga team on a dedicated page on your website. Besides a nice-looking image, the name and a short bio, you can also include in what type of yoga the person specializes. And including the person's social media outings can help them establish their own little traction on the web. Spread the yoga love.

    Unlike other types of businesses, yoga is perfect to create nice images for. And what better way to introduce your yoga studio than to include a photo gallery. It could be you, your fellow yoga teachers, showing of your yoga expertise with some intricate poses. You can include photos of your classes and specific events. Just don't forget to infuse them with the atmosphere that people are looking for: fun, relaxation, strength, endurance and people having a great time enjoying themselves.

    Don't forget the about page

    You'd be amazed how many people decide to visit the "about page" of a yoga website if it's available. As Suzan Greene puts it in her article " How to Write a Killer “About Us” Page": "Most likely, they’re prospective customers considering the purchase of your products or services. They’re trying to determine if they can trust you. They want to peek behind the curtain and see if your company is one they’d like to do business with."

    People want to know who you are, a bit of story why you do what you do, what people are involved, to know if they will have a fit with you and your yoga classes. They might have tried other yoga studio's before, came away dissappointed for some reason, or just moved cities. Whatever the reason, an About Page is a great opportunity for you to show your authentic self. Much more that what yoga classes you offer at what price, the individual counts. People can do yoga at home with the help of any tutorial they find on the internet. Besides paying you or the facility, the yoga instructors and the class, they're probably looking for some social interaction as well. We're all human beings. The About Page is a great tool in your online arsenal to perform some of this interaction upfront and convince them your yoga class is the one they're looking for.

    Add a contact section

    Some website elements just have to be in place. People expect them to be there. The Contact section, just as the About section, is one of these elements. So don't forget to include it. If you've chosen for you main call-to-action for people to sign up for your yoga classes, you can direct them to this page. And change a more generic inquiry form into a signup form. Alternatively, you can have both in place. Direct people who sign up to a separate page and for more pre-sale related questions use the contact form. Best of all would of course be to also include your telephonenumber. Which provides the best direct-sales opportunities.

    Leverage Social Media and include your accounts

    Chances are, you already use various social media outlets. Sites like Facebook, Twitter and Instagram have become huge parts in people's businesses. Rather than just overwhelm your audience with all types of unrelated content they aren't interested in, these channels are a great way to showcase you're an active participant of the yoga community. If that's indeed the case. Don't just include a social media channel just because you signed up for it in the past. Also take a moment to think about the fact if you want to show personal stuff on your site. Maybe you do.

    Either way, social media is a great tool to enhance your yoga website. Just don't let it be your main focus. For instance, including your instagram feed dedicated to yoga is a great way to immerse people in the world of yoga and your vision of it. Creating good looking photos isn't something that comes natural for everybody, but Instagram is an absolutely wonderful tool to dynamically enhance your yoga website.

    Add a newsletter signup form

    I have to give a warning about the topic of an newsletter. Don't do it if you won't use it. There's nothing more annoying that being bombarded by newsletter popup forms. If somebody goes to your site chances are he or she isn't there to signup for your newsletter.

    Email marketing, for which a newsletter signup is a means to even have list to mail to, is a very deep subject. Building a site is also a very expansive undertaking. Trying to do both might see you end up doing neither. Focus is key here. And my sincere suggestion is to first start with your site, then start with your blog and then decide you're ready for email marketing. If you never get around writing that awesome blog about yoga pants and attracting relevant traffic for it, there just no use in digging into email marketing.

    DIY versus web designer

    So you've made it to the end of this lengthy article. Congratulations. Now it's time to build that awesome website for your own yoga studio. But you might still be hesitant in how to approach it. Should you do the heavy lifting yourself or go for a web designer? If that's the case don't worry.

    I run a company that has provided yoga themes to people for years, including the option to host it with us. Although there's a great focus on technology, it's not the defining factor in whether somebody has a working yoga website or not. It's content. Getting bogged down into technical trivialities and design removes the focus from the big picture. About 40% of the people we host don't get past the first year of being in business with a site, simply because they don't put in the content creation work. You can have the best tools in the world, if you don't use it they mean nothing.

    That being said, it's definitely a good idea to at least have technical stuff be a bottleneck. So you can focus on creating content that brings in new business for your yoga studio. We offer a number of yoga themes for people who still want to host themselves. Besides individual themes we offer a very attractive hosting package. If you're the kind of person that never wants to worry about technical details ever, that's the package for you.

    Where to go from here.

    So you've made it to the end of this lengthy article. Congratulations. Now it's time to build that awesome website for your own yoga studio. But you might still be hesitant in how to approach it. Should you do the heavy lifting yourself or go for a web designer? If that's the case don't worry.

    I run a company that has provided yoga themes to people for years, including the option to host it with us. Although there's a great focus on technology, it's not the defining factor in whether somebody has a working yoga website or not. It's content. Getting bogged down into technical trivialities and design removes the focus from the big picture. About 40% of the people we host don't get past the first year of being in business with a site, simply because they don't put in the content creation work. You can have the best tools in the world, if you don't use it they mean nothing.

    That being said, it's definitely a good idea to at least have technical stuff be a bottleneck. So you can focus on creating content that brings in new business for your yoga studio. We offer a number of yoga themes for people who still want to host themselves. Besides individual themes we offer a very attractive hosting package. If you're the kind of person that never wants to worry about technical details ever, that's the package for you.

  • About the Author

    Johan van Seijen

    Co-founder

    Johan van Seijen is co-founder of Nexus Themes and our lead designer. After gaining a Master's Degree in Information Science he decided to try his luck in the illustration industry, working for clients as Avantgarde, Cosmopolitan and Glamour. With the return to the software industry grew the desire to create something to be truly proud of and which could spearhead his ambition of having his own company. And this company is what followed. He lives with his wife and daughter in Amsterdam.